May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month

In recognition of May being Skin Cancer Awareness Month the Cancer Research UK Oxford Centre will be posting a series of blog posts highlighting the contribution of Oxford researchers to global efforts to tackle Melanoma.

Melanoma is the 5th most common cancer in the UK, and although it is more common in older people, it is relatively common in younger people. In 2015 about 16,000 people in the UK were diagnosed with melanoma, and within the last decade this number has increased by almost 50%. Over 2,500 of these people will develop advanced disease. Treatment of Advanced Melanoma has recently been transformed by introducing immunotherapies and targeted inhibitors in the treatment of patients who are not cured by surgery.

Oxford’s researchers have a broad range of scientific backgrounds and expertise, and are focused on trying to develop novel immunotherapies (such as innate immune stimulators and oncolytic viruses) to treat Melanoma. They are also interested in how the behaviour of melanoma cells can change under stress. Other scientists are working on better tests to predict who benefits from new treatments, like immunotherapy, and to identify who is likely to get side effects. One example of the type of projects Oxford researchers have been involved in is the early clinical development of the new drug IMCgp100, which has shown promise in treating Melanoma patients, whose cancer cannot be removed with surgery or has spread to other parts of the body.

Further efforts of the Oxford community are typified in the articles summarised below.
(Researcher spotlights will be listed here throughoyt May)

Prof Mark Middleton – Co-director of the Cancer research UK Oxford Centre & Head of the Department of Oncology.