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New melanoma drug a step closer to the clinic

Previous phase 1 and 2 clinical trials have been conducted into Tebentafusp, a new anti-tumour immune response drug for patients with metastatic melanoma. The results from Immunocore and the University of Oxford, found that this first-of-its-kind treatment showed great promise in helping the immune system fight off melanoma cancers of both the eye and skin. The phase 3 clinical trial for this drug is the first for an affinity optimised T-cell receptor drug, making it the first of its kind.

Today, Immunocore the company behind the drug have announced trial results showing tebentafusp works better for patients with untreated metastatic uveal melanoma, when compared to other treatment choices.

“A positive survival benefit for tebentafusp represents a major step towards bringing a potential new treatment for cancer patients with a high unmet need. If approved, it would be the first new therapy to improve the overall survival in 40 years and to be specifically used in the treatment of metastatic uveal melanoma, a disease with poor survival where new therapies are urgently needed”

– Bahija Jallal, CEO of Immunocore

Tebentafusp comes out of clinical trials led by Prof Mark Middleton (Department of Oncology). Now, we see the potential for this drug coming into the clinic, subject to regulatory approval, as early as next year.

“It is very exciting that our observations in the first trial of tebentafusp, that it could make some uveal melanomas shrink, have now been borne out in larger studies. There’s still a way to go but there is every hope that this will prove an option for the treatment of this difficult cancer quite soon.”

– Prof Mark Middleton, University of Oxford and the National Institute for Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre.

Uveal melanoma is a rare and aggressive form of cancer that affects the eye, and typically has a poor prognosis and has no accepted optimal treatment and management. After the cancer metastases, 50% of patients have life expectancy of less than a year. Tebentafusp has the potential to be the first new therapy to improve the life expectancy of patients in over 40 years.

About the researchers

This research was funded by Immunocore.

Prof Mark Middleton is the Head of the Department of Oncology at the University of Oxford. He has overseen the development of internationally leading melanoma and upper GI clinical research groups and establishment of portfolios of early phase radiotherapy and haemato-oncology trials in Oxford. He is involved in the evaluation of novel immunotherapeutics, including pre-clinical development, trial design, proof of mechanism and proof of concept.

Immunocore, is a pioneering, clinical-stage T cell receptor biotechnology company working to develop and commercialise a new generation of transformative medicines to address unmet needs in cancer, infection and autoimmune diseases.  The Company’s most advanced programs are in oncology and it has a rich pipeline of programs in infectious and autoimmune diseases. Immunocore’s lead program, tebentafusp (IMCgp100), has entered pivotal clinical studies as a treatment for patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. Collaboration partners across the Immunocore pipeline include Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly and Company, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Immunocore is headquartered at Milton Park, Oxfordshire, UK, with offices in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania and Rockville, Maryland in the US. For more information, please visit www.immunocore.com.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) is based at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and run in partnership with the University of Oxford.

The NIHR is the nation’s largest funder of health and care research. The NIHR:

  • Funds, supports and delivers high quality research that benefits the NHS, public health and social care
  • Engages and involves patients, carers and the public in order to improve the reach, quality and impact of research
  • Attracts, trains and supports the best researchers to tackle the complex health and care challenges of the future
  • Invests in world-class infrastructure and a skilled delivery workforce to translate discoveries into improved treatments and services
  • Partners with other public funders, charities and industry to maximise the value of research to patients and the economy

The NIHR was established in 2006 to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research, and is funded by the Department of Health and Social Care. In addition to its national role, the NIHR supports applied health research for the direct and primary benefit of people in low- and middle-income countries, using UK aid from the UK government.

This work uses data provided by patients and collected by the NHS as part of their care and support and would not have been possible without access to this data. The NIHR recognises and values the role of patient data, securely accessed and stored, both in underpinning and leading to improvements in research and care. www.nihr.ac.uk/patientdata

 

What we can learn from cancer survivors

Understanding how an individual survives cancer, and why they respond well to therapy, can be vital in identifying new therapeutic targets. A new project seeks to see why some advanced pancreatic cancer patients overcome the odds and respond positively to treatment.

Innovative drug delivery techniques show promise in clinical trials

Pancreatic cancer has a limited response to chemotherapy treatment, due to the movement of anti-cancer drugs from the blood into tumour cells being limited by cellular mechanisms such as poor perfusion, high stromal content and raised interstitial pressure. One way to overcome these challenges and increase the toxic effect of chemotherapy treatment on a tumour would be to increase drug dosage. However, this would result in the damage of healthy non-tumour cells, and would likely result in unacceptable toxicity to patients.

The aim of Professor Constantin Coussios and his team in the Institute Biomedical Engineering is to develop of drug delivery system capable of enhancing drug penetration into and around a tumour, whilst minimising toxicity to the patient. The team has so far found a successful approach, by increasing drug uptake into tumours through warming of the body, which causes vasodilation.

By using focused ultrasound (FUS) to generate heat, only defined areas (approximately the size of a grain of rice) are targeted for treatment. In combination, chemotherapy drugs such as doxorubicin can be encapsulated in a heat-sensitive lipids (ThermoDox®), so that the active drug is only released when a specific temperature is reached at a specified location, as defined by the position of the FUS beam.

Research fellows Dr Michael Gray (Dept of Engineering) and Dr Laura Spiers (Dept of Oncology) have been working with the Department of Pathology in the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, to help characterise the efficacy of this approach, by assessing thermal and acoustic ultrasound properties of the ex vivo pancreas.

This new knowledge will be directly applied to patients in the new early phase clinical trial, PanDox (targeting pancreatic cancers with focused ultrasound and doxorubicin chemotherapy). This builds on the successful TarDox trial, which already demonstrated FUS-induced heating resulted in improved delivery of the ThermoDox® encapsulated chemotherapy drugs to liver metastases from various primary cancers.

The effect in the TarDox trial was such that a positive response to therapy from the tumour was seen after only a single treatment cycle in 4 out of 7 patients, even in cancers as colorectal adenocarcinoma (which is not known to respond to conventionally administered doxorubicin). These results suggest that if the cytotoxic threshold needed to successfully treat a tumour can be reached, then a positive response may be achieved without unacceptable toxic consequences on the patient.

The upcoming PanDox trial translates this approach to patients with non-resectable pancreatic adenocarcinomas. It will combine focused ultrasound to generate heat with ThermoDox® delivered into the blood.

The main aim of PanDox is to determine whether this novel approach to treating pancreatic cancer can enhance the amount of drug delivered to tumours that cannot be surgically removed. Secondary aims will assess tumour response and procedural safety. The first patients will be recruited from early 2021.

About the PanDox Team

Prof Constantin Coussios, PanDox Priniciple Investigator, is the Director of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering. His area of interest is in the study of drug delivery systems and improvement of delivery into tumours.  He founded and heads the Biomedical Ultrasonics, Biotherapy and Biopharmaceuticals Laboratory (BUBBL), a research group of 4 faculty and some 45 researchers working on a wide array of therapeutic applications. He is also serves as the Director of the Oxford Centre for Drug Delivery Devices.

Dr Laura Spiers is a doctor of Medical Oncology. She is currently undertaking a DPhil in Oncology with the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, investigating ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery.

Dr Michael Gray is a Senior Research Fellow, interested in the clinical therapeutic potential of ultrasound.

Funding boost for OxPLoreD early detection study

OxPLoreD is an observational cohort study sponsored by Johnson and Johnson that will recruit 1650 patients from across the UK with pre-cancerous lymphoproliferative disorders. These conditions include monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance that put individuals at higher risk of developing the blood cancers chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and multiple myeloma respectively.

The aim of the study is to look for new ways to find and treat blood cancer sooner by identifying clinical, genomic and immunological predictive markers of progression from these pre-cancerous conditions to malignant disease. The study will also explore the possibility of a future early intervention trial for the subgroup of patients at highest risk of progression.

OxPLoreD is one of the seven clinical trials that have received an £8m funding boost from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and will work in partnership with Genomics England. The funding will speed up the adoption of whole genome sequencing in the study of cancer. Genetic analysis is a critical tool that can allow clinicians to select the most appropriate treatments for each patient. In the OxPLoreD study, genetic analysis might be able to identify individuals at highest risk of disease progression that would benefit from earlier treatment. In the longer term this may also enable the identification of those people who would benefit from certain types of treatment.

Alison Cave, UKRI challenge director says:

“Research tells us that one-in-two people in the UK population will get cancer. That stark statistic shows just how important it is for us to seek new treatments. The use of genetic analysis opens new possibilities in our drive to beat cancer. The projects for which we have announced funding today are exciting pointers to future diagnosis and precision treatments”

The funding has been delivered through UKRI’s Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s £210m data to early diagnosis and precision medicine (DEDPM) programme. The challenge aims to combine research data and evidence from the NHS to create new and improved ways of identifying disease and treatment pathways.

Prof. Sir Mark Caulfield, Chief Scientist at Genomics England says:

“The 100,000 Genomes Project, Genomics England has analysed the genomes of over 17,000 cancer participants and this suggests that up to half have revealed mutations of potential clinical significance. The DEDPM programme is a major opportunity to expand the application of whole genome sequencing into clinical trials involving cancer where support from the ISCF is likely to deliver significant clinical benefit”

For more information about the other trials funded by this scheme, see the UK Research and Innovation announcement.

A new FRONTIER for breast cancer

Latest news from FRONTIER, the trial investigating the potential of the radiotracer Fluciclovine in the subtyping and staging of breast cancers

How chemotherapy impacts the body

Current standard cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, can have lasting effects on the body. Chemotherapy for example is associated with many side effects, such as nausea and anaemia, due to the impact of the toxins on healthy tissue as well as the tumour.

Neoadjuvant therapy, whereby therapies are administered before the main treatment, to help reduce the size of a tumor or kill cancer cells that have spread, has previously been suggested to contribute to changes in the composition of a patient’s body. This includes reduction in muscle mass (or ‘sarcopenia’) which is a natural result of aging, but in those with cancer it can lead to some post-operative complications and other diseases further down the line.

A new study from Mr Nick Maynard, Oxford University Hospitals Trust, has assessed the changes in muscle mass in gastro-oesophageal cancer patients, to better understand the long-lasting impact therapies have on the body and if it can be used to predict the risk of post-op complications. From a sample of 199 patients, they observed a decrease in skeletal mass in all individuals, with 91 participants losing more than 5% of their original skeletal mass. Those with a high rate of muscle mass depletion were generally male and significantly older, i.e. over the age of 67 years old.

50% of patients in the study experienced post-operative complications, such as pneumonia, with 13% having severe complications. However, Nick and the team observed that this was not related to the patient’s loss of skeletal mass.

Fortunately, this means that patients undergoing surgery for oesophageal cancer with large reductions in muscle mass are not necessarily at an increased risk of post-operative complications. Whilst these results do not produce any new method for predicting post-op complications, as sarcopenia did not determine the frequency of post-op complications in the sampled patients, they provide a deeper understanding of how neoadjuvant therapies can impact the body. This is important as post-operative loss of muscle mass has been previously associated with a lower survival rate for oesophageal cancer patients, so this will help to inform clinicians which patients may need to be more closely monitored.

Therapeutic potential for breast cancer found in the matrix

Work currently underway in the laboratory of Prof Kim Midwood is investigating the therapeutic anti-cancer potential of tenascin-C, a molecule found in the extracellular matrix of breast cancer

Understanding clonal haematopoiesis for COVID and cancer

Prof Paresh Vyas and team have been investigating how a better understanding of clonal haematopoiesis can be applied to both cancer and to care of COVID patients

Balancing the benefits and risks of radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

Dr Rebecca Shakir is devising a tool to allow some blood cancer patients to make more informed decisions about the risks and benefits of their radiotherapy treatment

Epigenetic markers for melanoma patient response to ICB therapy

Development fund winners Rosalin Cooper & Ben Fairfax are investigating the epigenetic landscape of melanoma patients and how it can impact patient sensitivity to ICB therapy