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New clinical prediction tools for myeloma

Myeloma is a cancer of the bone marrow that caused 117,077 deaths worldwide in 2020 (International Agency for Research on Cancer). Earlier diagnosis improves the rate of survival but unfortunately, delays in myeloma diagnosis are common and result in poorer patient outcomes.

One of the reasons for the diagnostic delay is that myeloma symptoms are non-specific and relatively common in people without cancer. For example, back pain is associated with myeloma yet there are many other non-myeloma causes of this symptom. Additional measures are therefore needed to highlight the possibility of myeloma in patients where GPs do not originally suspect this disease.

GPs frequently order simple laboratory tests, such as the full blood count, to investigate patients presenting with non-specific symptoms. Previous work by Dr Constantinos Koshiaris, Dr Jason Oke, Dr Brian Nicholson and colleagues from Oxford’s Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences and the University of Exeter identified certain abnormalities in blood test results that indicate a higher risk of myeloma, such as low haemoglobin which can be observed up to 2 years before a myeloma diagnosis.

In this paper published recently in the British Journal of General Practice, the Oxford researchers have developed new clinical prediction models for myeloma that incorporate both symptoms and blood test results. Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (GOLD version), a primary care database containing electronic health records for more than 11 million patients in the UK, the team identified the most common symptoms and full blood count results recorded for patients with myeloma. The most predictive of these were included in the models they developed and the new tools were validated against a set of test data. Decisions made using their prediction models resulted in fewer false positives and more true positives when compared to single tests or symptoms alone.

By identifying patients at highest risk of myeloma in primary care, these new prediction rules have the potential to reduce diagnostic delays by a substantial amount. Further research is now needed to understand more about the feasibility and implementation of this tool in the primary care setting and the impact it will have on the diagnostic pathway and patient outcomes.

Early Detection Award for research into the clinical application of single cell genomics

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of blood cancers in which the bone marrow fails to make normal levels of blood cells. MDS can be broadly classified into two major groups: high-risk MDS, in which patients progress to acute myeloid leukaemia with a very poor survival rate; and low-risk MDS, in which the disease is less aggressive but patients still suffer from a huge burden of symptoms, often the result of anaemia.

There are a number of exciting new targeted treatment options for low-risk MDS. However, these do not work in all patients and, particularly given the high economic cost of newer treatments, current biomarkers are not sufficiently predictive of treatment response. There is a need to more precisely categorise MDS to predict the disease trajectory and the response to therapy so that the most effective treatment can be given to each patient.

Large investments in sequencing technology in clinical laboratory services are enabling precision medicine in certain cancers and revolutionising patient care. Dr Onima Chowdhury, MRC Clinical Academic Research Fellow and Consultant Haematologist (MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine and Oxford University Hospitals) is working with Professor Adam Mead, Dr Supat Thongjuea and Dr Lynn Quek at the MRC WIMM to explore the use of single-cell genomics in the clinical diagnosis and management of MDS. Funded by a Cancer Research UK Early Detection and Diagnosis Primer Award, the team will seek to develop a simple, clinically applicable processing and analysis pipeline, as well as identifying biomarkers that correlate and can perhaps supersede current diagnostic modalities.

Long-term, the team hope that this approach will be able to improve outcomes of patients through improved diagnosis, risk prediction and targeted treatment in MDS and other haematological malignancies.

Prof Andi Roy receives new award for immune-cell research

Co-funded by Cancer Research UK and Children with Cancer UK, Andi is one of 5 to receive £1 million each to investigate children’s and young people’s cancers.

Detecting myeloma earlier

Several research projects are underway in Oxford focusing on different points in the clinical care pathway to improve myeloma early detection.

Funding boost for OxPLoreD early detection study

OxPLoreD is an observational cohort study sponsored by Johnson and Johnson that will recruit 1650 patients from across the UK with pre-cancerous lymphoproliferative disorders. These conditions include monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance that put individuals at higher risk of developing the blood cancers chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and multiple myeloma respectively.

The aim of the study is to look for new ways to find and treat blood cancer sooner by identifying clinical, genomic and immunological predictive markers of progression from these pre-cancerous conditions to malignant disease. The study will also explore the possibility of a future early intervention trial for the subgroup of patients at highest risk of progression.

OxPLoreD is one of the seven clinical trials that have received an £8m funding boost from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) and will work in partnership with Genomics England. The funding will speed up the adoption of whole genome sequencing in the study of cancer. Genetic analysis is a critical tool that can allow clinicians to select the most appropriate treatments for each patient. In the OxPLoreD study, genetic analysis might be able to identify individuals at highest risk of disease progression that would benefit from earlier treatment. In the longer term this may also enable the identification of those people who would benefit from certain types of treatment.

Alison Cave, UKRI challenge director says:

“Research tells us that one-in-two people in the UK population will get cancer. That stark statistic shows just how important it is for us to seek new treatments. The use of genetic analysis opens new possibilities in our drive to beat cancer. The projects for which we have announced funding today are exciting pointers to future diagnosis and precision treatments”

The funding has been delivered through UKRI’s Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund’s £210m data to early diagnosis and precision medicine (DEDPM) programme. The challenge aims to combine research data and evidence from the NHS to create new and improved ways of identifying disease and treatment pathways.

Prof. Sir Mark Caulfield, Chief Scientist at Genomics England says:

“The 100,000 Genomes Project, Genomics England has analysed the genomes of over 17,000 cancer participants and this suggests that up to half have revealed mutations of potential clinical significance. The DEDPM programme is a major opportunity to expand the application of whole genome sequencing into clinical trials involving cancer where support from the ISCF is likely to deliver significant clinical benefit”

For more information about the other trials funded by this scheme, see the UK Research and Innovation announcement.

The developmental origins of resistant infant leukaemia

The Roy and Milne labs are investigating the developmental origins of infant leukaemia and its influence on the biology of the disease

Understanding clonal haematopoiesis for COVID and cancer

Prof Paresh Vyas and team have been investigating how a better understanding of clonal haematopoiesis can be applied to both cancer and to care of COVID patients

Helping blood cancer patients in the COVID era

The Oxford-led UK Coronavirus Cancer Monitoring Project was launched earlier this year to help clinicians better treat blood cancer patients in a safe way during the COVID-pandemic

Tackling blood cancers in Tanzania and Uganda

Scientists from Tanzania, Uganda and Oxford University have teamed up in a new child blood cancer program

Balancing the benefits and risks of radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

Dr Rebecca Shakir is devising a tool to allow some blood cancer patients to make more informed decisions about the risks and benefits of their radiotherapy treatment