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Supporting Local and International Oesophageal Cancer Research Efforts with Clinical Data Infrastructure

Transatlantic collaboration to support earlier detection of pancreatic and oesophageal cancer

Oxford researcher Chunxiao Song, who is a group leader and chemist at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, recently gave an interview to CRUK speaking about his work recently funded by the CRUK-OHSU Project Award. The Award is jointly funded by CRUK and Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU).

In collaboration with Dr Thuy Ngo (OHSU) Chunxiao is developing novel tools to analyse liquid biopsies for pancreatic and oesophageal cancer. The aim is to use epigenetic and transcriptome technology to detect cancer earlier and provide information on where the cancer originated from. The researchers plan to use machine learning to create classification models that distinguish cancer patients from healthy controls.

The collaborating researchers believe that a combination of those two technologies will generate a fuller picture than a focus on just one technology. Chunxiao explains: “Our project uses liquid biopsies – a test that looks for DNA and RNA shed by tumours (and in fact all cells) in a patient’s blood sample. I have developed new measuring technologies that use less harsh chemicals than the standard approach. This causes less DNA degradation, which makes it easier to measure small quantities of cell -free DNA. Thuy has focused her research on measuring cell-free RNA. This is even more difficult than measuring cell-free DNA – but she has developed a special protocol that’s really gentle and doesn’t cause degradation of the RNA.”

Chunxiao also speaks about his experiences with applying for CRUK funded grants. He emphasises how uncomplicated the process is, and how well CRUK supports applicants: “My advice to anyone thinking of putting in an application is to contact the CRUK funding managers early on because they can help guide you through the process from the beginning.”

The full interview can be found via this link.

 

 

(Content adapted from www.cancerresearchuk.org)

Aspirin and acid reflux medication reduce the likelihood of patients with Barrett’s oesophagus developing oesophageal cancer.

Results of the AspECT clinical trial, coordinated by the CRUK Oxford Centre supported Oncology Clinical Trials Office, have shown the important role aspirin and acid reflux treatment can have in preventing those at high risk of oesophageal cancer from going on to develop the disease.

The trial led by Professor Janusz Jankowski had results presented last week at the American Society of Clinical Oncology conference. The trial investigated the chemo preventative effects of different doses of the antacid medication esomeprazole, with and without low dose aspirin in patients with Barrett’s oesophagus. Since acid reflux is involved in causing Barrett’s oesophagus it had been suggested that reduction of acid to very low levels might prevent progression to cancer.

The randomised phase III trial involved over 2500 patients who were followed for 7.9 years. Patients who followed a seven year course of high dose of esomeprazole with low dose aspirin, followed by high dose esomeprazole, were 20% less likely to develop oesophageal cancer than if they had been untreated.

Professor Janusz Jankowski, who completed an MSc in clinical trial research at Oxford University in 2009 and is currently Professor of Medicine at the University of Central Lancashire said: “Our results are very exciting. Oesophageal cancer is hard to diagnose and hard to treat. So, we’re pleased that such a cheap and well-established medicine can prevent and/or delay development of cancer for these patients. Our hope is that this may also offer an opportunity to prevent oesophageal cancer in wider populations.”