The search for pancreatic cancer biomarkers

Pancreatic cancer has the lowest survival rate of any cancer in the UK, due in part to the limited ability to diagnose it at an early stage. Earlier detection of pancreatic cancer is a major priority of cancer researchers, in order to identify tumours at an earlier stage when they are more easily treatable.

Identifiable biomarkers (naturally occurring molecules which can be related to the presence of a cancer) is one method that can be used to predict or diagnose pancreatic cancer. Currently, the previously-identified biomarkers available have a limited ability to accurately diagnose pancreatic cancer. There is a need to identify new biomarkers that more accurately predict the presence of pancreatic cancer for improved earlier diagnosis.

Dr Christiana Kartsonaki, a senior scientist at the MRC Population Health Research Unit in the Nuffield Department of Population Health, is leading investigations on the potential of protein biomarkers in blood, using data from the China Kadoorie Biobank. Blood samples from over 500,000 Chinese adults have been collected as part of this data set, allowing researchers to identify circulating proteins in the blood and see which individuals went on to develop pancreatic cancer.

During 9 years of follow-up, 700 individuals from the ~500,000 went on to develop pancreatic cancer. From their blood samples, Dr Christiana Kartsonaki and her colleagues will be able to identify a number of protein biomarkers that are associated with a future risk of pancreatic cancer. This study builds on their previous work on the associations of metabolic and lifestyle factors with risk of pancreatic cancer.

Identification of biomarkers may prove very useful in the establishment of strategies to utilise these proteins in predicting the development of pancreatic cancer and help with its diagnosis.

Results from this research will likely be published next year. Once biomarkers are identified, this work may help researchers understand the role that individual proteins play in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer, and whether they may have therapeutic potential as drug targets in its treatment.

About the study

This study is funded by the Nuffield Department of Population Health, Pancreatic Cancer UK and the CRUK Oxford Centre. It was co-led by Associate Professor Michael Holmes, Professor Zhengming Chen, Dr Yuanjie Pang and Dr Christiana Kartsonaki.